Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Mass ingestion of Jimson Weed by eleven teenagers.
Del Med J. 1998 Nov; 70(11):471-6.DM

Abstract

Jimson Weed is a naturally occurring plant which is commonly ingested for its hallucinogenic properties. This paper is a case report summarizing 11 cases of patients, ages 13-21 years, who presented to our emergency department following oral ingestion of large quantities of Jimson Weed pods and seeds. Toxicity following ingestion is due to an atropine-containing alkaloid contained throughout the plant and concentrated in the seeds. Signs and symptoms ranged from asymptomatic mydriasis and tachycardia to severe agitation, disorientation, and hallucinations. Nine of the eleven patients were admitted for observation. There were no deaths associated with these ingestions and none of the patients required physostigmine for reversal of severe anticholinergic symptoms. This paper also includes an historical overview of Jimson Weed, its physiologic effects, the epidemiological data, and a treatment summary.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9846457

Citation

Tiongson, J, and P Salen. "Mass Ingestion of Jimson Weed By Eleven Teenagers." Delaware Medical Journal, vol. 70, no. 11, 1998, pp. 471-6.
Tiongson J, Salen P. Mass ingestion of Jimson Weed by eleven teenagers. Del Med J. 1998;70(11):471-6.
Tiongson, J., & Salen, P. (1998). Mass ingestion of Jimson Weed by eleven teenagers. Delaware Medical Journal, 70(11), 471-6.
Tiongson J, Salen P. Mass Ingestion of Jimson Weed By Eleven Teenagers. Del Med J. 1998;70(11):471-6. PubMed PMID: 9846457.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mass ingestion of Jimson Weed by eleven teenagers. AU - Tiongson,J, AU - Salen,P, PY - 1998/12/10/pubmed PY - 1998/12/10/medline PY - 1998/12/10/entrez SP - 471 EP - 6 JF - Delaware medical journal JO - Del Med J VL - 70 IS - 11 N2 - Jimson Weed is a naturally occurring plant which is commonly ingested for its hallucinogenic properties. This paper is a case report summarizing 11 cases of patients, ages 13-21 years, who presented to our emergency department following oral ingestion of large quantities of Jimson Weed pods and seeds. Toxicity following ingestion is due to an atropine-containing alkaloid contained throughout the plant and concentrated in the seeds. Signs and symptoms ranged from asymptomatic mydriasis and tachycardia to severe agitation, disorientation, and hallucinations. Nine of the eleven patients were admitted for observation. There were no deaths associated with these ingestions and none of the patients required physostigmine for reversal of severe anticholinergic symptoms. This paper also includes an historical overview of Jimson Weed, its physiologic effects, the epidemiological data, and a treatment summary. SN - 0011-7781 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9846457/Mass_ingestion_of_Jimson_Weed_by_eleven_teenagers_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -