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Pyrethroid-impregnated bed nets for personal protection against malaria for Afghan refugees.

Abstract

A field trial of permethrin-impregnated bed nets (PIBs) was conducted in 2 Afghan refugee villages in Pakistan. Nets were issued to only 10% of families (= 1398 people); this simulated a situation in which bed nets are gradually adopted by villagers in Afghanistan. A further 10% lacking bed nets were selected as controls from the same villages. An initial survey showed that 86% of household heads were aware that malaria was transmitted by mosquito bites, but only 2% had used bed nets before. Trial families were encouraged to attend the village health centres if they fell ill. Microscopy records showed that, between July and December 1991, 22.4% of the control group became infected with Plasmodium vivax and 13.0% contracted P. falciparum while in the intervention group only 9.9% contracted P. vivax (relative risk 0.58, confidence interval [CI] 95% 0.49-0.68) and only 3.8% contracted P. falciparum (relative risk 0.39, 95% CI 0.29-0.53). A single treatment of the nets with permethrin at 0.5g/m2 remained protective throughout the 6 months' transmission season. 73% of families claimed to use their nets every night; members of families who claimed to use nets less regularly showed an incidence similar to that of the control group. There was no sex or age difference in net use or protective efficacy. Headlouse infestation rates were reduced in PIB users. Few nets were washed, given away or sold. The prospect for PIBs as personal protection appears good, despite people's lack of previous experience.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

HealthNet International, University Town, Peshawar, Pakistan.

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Source

MeSH

Adolescent
Adult
Afghanistan
Age Factors
Anemia
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Insecticides
Lice Infestations
Malaria, Falciparum
Malaria, Vivax
Male
Mosquito Control
Pakistan
Permethrin
Prevalence
Pyrethrins
Random Allocation
Refugees
Sex Factors

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8882175

Citation

* When formatting your citation, note that all book, journal, and database titles should be italicized* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pyrethroid-impregnated bed nets for personal protection against malaria for Afghan refugees. AU - Rowland,M, AU - Bouma,M, AU - Ducornez,D, AU - Durrani,N, AU - Rozendaal,J, AU - Schapira,A, AU - Sondorp,E, PY - 1996/7/1/pubmed PY - 1996/7/1/medline PY - 1996/7/1/entrez SP - 357 EP - 61 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 90 IS - 4 N2 - A field trial of permethrin-impregnated bed nets (PIBs) was conducted in 2 Afghan refugee villages in Pakistan. Nets were issued to only 10% of families (= 1398 people); this simulated a situation in which bed nets are gradually adopted by villagers in Afghanistan. A further 10% lacking bed nets were selected as controls from the same villages. An initial survey showed that 86% of household heads were aware that malaria was transmitted by mosquito bites, but only 2% had used bed nets before. Trial families were encouraged to attend the village health centres if they fell ill. Microscopy records showed that, between July and December 1991, 22.4% of the control group became infected with Plasmodium vivax and 13.0% contracted P. falciparum while in the intervention group only 9.9% contracted P. vivax (relative risk 0.58, confidence interval [CI] 95% 0.49-0.68) and only 3.8% contracted P. falciparum (relative risk 0.39, 95% CI 0.29-0.53). A single treatment of the nets with permethrin at 0.5g/m2 remained protective throughout the 6 months' transmission season. 73% of families claimed to use their nets every night; members of families who claimed to use nets less regularly showed an incidence similar to that of the control group. There was no sex or age difference in net use or protective efficacy. Headlouse infestation rates were reduced in PIB users. Few nets were washed, given away or sold. The prospect for PIBs as personal protection appears good, despite people's lack of previous experience. SN - 0035-9203 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8882175/Pyrethroid_impregnated_bed_nets_for_personal_protection_against_malaria_for_Afghan_refugees_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -