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Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years.
J Med Toxicol. 2018 03; 14(1):74-78.JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is little published data about human plant exposures reported to US poison control centers (PCCs).

METHODS

A retrospective chart review of all reported plant exposures to a single regional PCC between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010 was done to understand better the characteristics of plant exposure cases. Specific generic plant codes were used to identify cases. Recorded variables included patient demographics, plant involved, exposure variables, symptoms, management site, treatments, and outcome. Univariate and multivariate regression was used to identify outcome predictors.

RESULTS

A total of 6492 charts met inclusion criteria. The average age was 16.6 years (2 months-94 years); 52.4% were male. The most common exposure reason was unintentional (98%), and the majority (92.4%) occurred at the patient's home. Ingestions (58.3%) and dermal exposures (34.3%) accounted for most cases. Cactus (27.5%), oleander (12.5%), Lantana (5.7%), and Bougainvillea (3.8%) were most commonly involved. Symptoms developed in 47.1% of patients, and were more likely to occur following Datura (66.7%), and Morning Glory or Milkweed (25% each) exposures. Almost 94% of patients were managed onsite (home) and only 5.2% involved evaluation in a health care facility (HCF). Only 37 (0.6%) patients required hospital admission, and 2.9% of cases resulted in more than minimal effects. Exposures resulting in more than minimal clinical effects were predicted by several variables: abnormal vital signs (OR = 35.62), abnormal labs (OR = 14.87), and management at a HCF (OR = 7.37). Hospital admissions were increased for patients already at a HCF (OR = 54.01), abnormal vital signs (OR = 23.28), and intentional exposures (OR = 14.7).

CONCLUSION

Plant exposures reported to our poison control center were typically unintentional ingestions occurring at home. Most patients were managed onsite and few developed significant symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. daniel.brooks@bannerhealth.com. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA. daniel.brooks@bannerhealth.com. Department of Medical Toxicology, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, 1012 East Willetta Road, 2nd Floor, Phoenix, AZ, 85006, USA. daniel.brooks@bannerhealth.com.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Banner Poison and Drug Information Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Center for Toxicology and Pharmacology Education and Research, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Department of Internal Medicine, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29330731

Citation

Enfield, Ben, et al. "Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years." Journal of Medical Toxicology : Official Journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology, vol. 14, no. 1, 2018, pp. 74-78.
Enfield B, Brooks DE, Welch S, et al. Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years. J Med Toxicol. 2018;14(1):74-78.
Enfield, B., Brooks, D. E., Welch, S., Roland, M., Klemens, J., Greenlief, K., Olson, R., & Gerkin, R. D. (2018). Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years. Journal of Medical Toxicology : Official Journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology, 14(1), 74-78. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-017-0643-3
Enfield B, et al. Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years. J Med Toxicol. 2018;14(1):74-78. PubMed PMID: 29330731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human Plant Exposures Reported to a Regional (Southwestern) Poison Control Center Over 8 Years. AU - Enfield,Ben, AU - Brooks,Daniel E, AU - Welch,Sharyn, AU - Roland,Maureen, AU - Klemens,Jane, AU - Greenlief,Kim, AU - Olson,Rachel, AU - Gerkin,Richard D, Y1 - 2018/01/12/ PY - 2017/07/24/received PY - 2017/11/28/accepted PY - 2017/11/21/revised PY - 2018/1/14/pubmed PY - 2019/9/24/medline PY - 2018/1/14/entrez KW - Plants KW - Poison center KW - Toxicity SP - 74 EP - 78 JF - Journal of medical toxicology : official journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology JO - J Med Toxicol VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is little published data about human plant exposures reported to US poison control centers (PCCs). METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all reported plant exposures to a single regional PCC between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010 was done to understand better the characteristics of plant exposure cases. Specific generic plant codes were used to identify cases. Recorded variables included patient demographics, plant involved, exposure variables, symptoms, management site, treatments, and outcome. Univariate and multivariate regression was used to identify outcome predictors. RESULTS: A total of 6492 charts met inclusion criteria. The average age was 16.6 years (2 months-94 years); 52.4% were male. The most common exposure reason was unintentional (98%), and the majority (92.4%) occurred at the patient's home. Ingestions (58.3%) and dermal exposures (34.3%) accounted for most cases. Cactus (27.5%), oleander (12.5%), Lantana (5.7%), and Bougainvillea (3.8%) were most commonly involved. Symptoms developed in 47.1% of patients, and were more likely to occur following Datura (66.7%), and Morning Glory or Milkweed (25% each) exposures. Almost 94% of patients were managed onsite (home) and only 5.2% involved evaluation in a health care facility (HCF). Only 37 (0.6%) patients required hospital admission, and 2.9% of cases resulted in more than minimal effects. Exposures resulting in more than minimal clinical effects were predicted by several variables: abnormal vital signs (OR = 35.62), abnormal labs (OR = 14.87), and management at a HCF (OR = 7.37). Hospital admissions were increased for patients already at a HCF (OR = 54.01), abnormal vital signs (OR = 23.28), and intentional exposures (OR = 14.7). CONCLUSION: Plant exposures reported to our poison control center were typically unintentional ingestions occurring at home. Most patients were managed onsite and few developed significant symptoms. SN - 1937-6995 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29330731/Human_Plant_Exposures_Reported_to_a_Regional__Southwestern__Poison_Control_Center_Over_8_Years_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13181-017-0643-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -