Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sticky situations: cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system.
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2017 Nov; 55(9):1001-1003.CT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Cyanoacrylate (Super Glue®) exposures are commonly reported to poison control centers, but little has been published in the medical literature regarding these exposures. We sought to characterize cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective review of a poison system's database for all cases of single-substance human exposure to cyanoacrylate-containing products from 2005 to 2015. Data collected included age, gender, route of exposure, clinical effects, treatments recommended and medical outcome.

RESULTS

There were a total of 893 patients, 505 (56.6%) of which were female. Patient ages ranged from 6 months to 88 years with a median of 11 years. The vast majority of exposures (n = 871, 97.5%) were unintentional, but a small number of exposures (n = 22, 2.5%) were due to intentional misuse (such as trying to stop a bleeding cut) or malicious intent (such as purposefully gluing a person's eyes shut as a prank). Routes of exposure included: ingestion, n = 337 (37.7%); ocular, n = 322 (36.1%); dermatologic, n = 285 (31.9%); inhalation, n = 16 (1.8%); nasal, n = 1 (0.1%); and otic, n = 1 (0.1%); some patients had multiple routes of exposure. Treatments recommended by the poison center included irrigation (n = 411), petroleum jelly (n = 143), mineral oil (n = 131), topical antibiotic ointment (n = 82), peanut butter (n = 6), acetone (n = 4) and WD-40® (n = 2). A total of 657 patients (73.6%) were managed on-site, while 236 (26.4%) were seen in a health care facility. Among all exposures, effects were classified as none (n = 287), minor (n = 529) and moderate (n = 77). No major effects or deaths were reported.

CONCLUSIONS

In this case series, the majority of cases occurred in children and most exposures did not result in significant morbidity. Notably, there was wide variation in terms of recommended treatments; further study is needed to determine the optimal treatment method and to standardize poison center recommendations for treating patients with cyanoacrylate exposures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine , University of California , San Diego , CA , USA. b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.a Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine , University of California , San Diego , CA , USA. b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.b California Poison Control System , San Diego , CA , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28535077

Citation

Carstairs, Shaun D., et al. "Sticky Situations: Cyanoacrylate Exposures Reported to a Poison Control System." Clinical Toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.), vol. 55, no. 9, 2017, pp. 1001-1003.
Carstairs SD, Koh C, Qian L, et al. Sticky situations: cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2017;55(9):1001-1003.
Carstairs, S. D., Koh, C., Qian, L., Qozi, M., Seivard, G., & Cantrell, F. L. (2017). Sticky situations: cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system. Clinical Toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.), 55(9), 1001-1003. https://doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2017.1327067
Carstairs SD, et al. Sticky Situations: Cyanoacrylate Exposures Reported to a Poison Control System. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2017;55(9):1001-1003. PubMed PMID: 28535077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sticky situations: cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system. AU - Carstairs,Shaun D, AU - Koh,Cynthia, AU - Qian,Lily, AU - Qozi,Mariam, AU - Seivard,Grant, AU - Cantrell,F Lee, Y1 - 2017/05/23/ PY - 2017/5/24/pubmed PY - 2017/9/12/medline PY - 2017/5/24/entrez KW - Cyanoacrylate KW - poison center KW - super glue SP - 1001 EP - 1003 JF - Clinical toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.) JO - Clin Toxicol (Phila) VL - 55 IS - 9 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Cyanoacrylate (Super Glue®) exposures are commonly reported to poison control centers, but little has been published in the medical literature regarding these exposures. We sought to characterize cyanoacrylate exposures reported to a poison control system. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of a poison system's database for all cases of single-substance human exposure to cyanoacrylate-containing products from 2005 to 2015. Data collected included age, gender, route of exposure, clinical effects, treatments recommended and medical outcome. RESULTS: There were a total of 893 patients, 505 (56.6%) of which were female. Patient ages ranged from 6 months to 88 years with a median of 11 years. The vast majority of exposures (n = 871, 97.5%) were unintentional, but a small number of exposures (n = 22, 2.5%) were due to intentional misuse (such as trying to stop a bleeding cut) or malicious intent (such as purposefully gluing a person's eyes shut as a prank). Routes of exposure included: ingestion, n = 337 (37.7%); ocular, n = 322 (36.1%); dermatologic, n = 285 (31.9%); inhalation, n = 16 (1.8%); nasal, n = 1 (0.1%); and otic, n = 1 (0.1%); some patients had multiple routes of exposure. Treatments recommended by the poison center included irrigation (n = 411), petroleum jelly (n = 143), mineral oil (n = 131), topical antibiotic ointment (n = 82), peanut butter (n = 6), acetone (n = 4) and WD-40® (n = 2). A total of 657 patients (73.6%) were managed on-site, while 236 (26.4%) were seen in a health care facility. Among all exposures, effects were classified as none (n = 287), minor (n = 529) and moderate (n = 77). No major effects or deaths were reported. CONCLUSIONS: In this case series, the majority of cases occurred in children and most exposures did not result in significant morbidity. Notably, there was wide variation in terms of recommended treatments; further study is needed to determine the optimal treatment method and to standardize poison center recommendations for treating patients with cyanoacrylate exposures. SN - 1556-9519 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28535077/Sticky_situations:_cyanoacrylate_exposures_reported_to_a_poison_control_system_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15563650.2017.1327067 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -