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Are the neuromotor disabilities of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction disorders related to the cerebellum and its connections?
Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Feb; 20(1):47-51.SF

Abstract

Investigators have hypothesized a range of subcortical neuropathology in the genesis of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND). The current review builds on this speculation with a specific focus on the cerebellum and its connections in the development of the subtle neuromotor disabilities of BIND. The focus on the cerebellum derives from the following observations: (i) the cerebellum is vulnerable to bilirubin-induced injury; perhaps the most vulnerable region within the central nervous system; (ii) infants with cerebellar injury exhibit a neuromotor phenotype similar to BIND; and (iii) the cerebellum has extensive bidirectional circuitry projections to motor and non-motor regions of the brainstem and cerebral cortex that impact a variety of neurobehaviors. Future study using advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging techniques have the potential to shed new insights into bilirubin's effect on neural network topology via both structural and functional brain connectivity measurements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address: jwatchko@mail.magee.edu.Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25547431

Citation

Watchko, Jon F., et al. "Are the Neuromotor Disabilities of Bilirubin-induced Neurologic Dysfunction Disorders Related to the Cerebellum and Its Connections?" Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, vol. 20, no. 1, 2015, pp. 47-51.
Watchko JF, Painter MJ, Panigrahy A. Are the neuromotor disabilities of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction disorders related to the cerebellum and its connections? Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;20(1):47-51.
Watchko, J. F., Painter, M. J., & Panigrahy, A. (2015). Are the neuromotor disabilities of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction disorders related to the cerebellum and its connections? Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, 20(1), 47-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.siny.2014.12.004
Watchko JF, Painter MJ, Panigrahy A. Are the Neuromotor Disabilities of Bilirubin-induced Neurologic Dysfunction Disorders Related to the Cerebellum and Its Connections. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;20(1):47-51. PubMed PMID: 25547431.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are the neuromotor disabilities of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction disorders related to the cerebellum and its connections? AU - Watchko,Jon F, AU - Painter,Michael J, AU - Panigrahy,Ashok, Y1 - 2014/12/24/ PY - 2014/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/12/31/pubmed PY - 2016/1/1/medline KW - Bilirubin KW - Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) KW - Cerebellum KW - Magnetic resonance imaging KW - Subtle kernicterus SP - 47 EP - 51 JF - Seminars in fetal & neonatal medicine JO - Semin Fetal Neonatal Med VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - Investigators have hypothesized a range of subcortical neuropathology in the genesis of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND). The current review builds on this speculation with a specific focus on the cerebellum and its connections in the development of the subtle neuromotor disabilities of BIND. The focus on the cerebellum derives from the following observations: (i) the cerebellum is vulnerable to bilirubin-induced injury; perhaps the most vulnerable region within the central nervous system; (ii) infants with cerebellar injury exhibit a neuromotor phenotype similar to BIND; and (iii) the cerebellum has extensive bidirectional circuitry projections to motor and non-motor regions of the brainstem and cerebral cortex that impact a variety of neurobehaviors. Future study using advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging techniques have the potential to shed new insights into bilirubin's effect on neural network topology via both structural and functional brain connectivity measurements. SN - 1878-0946 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25547431/Are_the_neuromotor_disabilities_of_bilirubin_induced_neurologic_dysfunction_disorders_related_to_the_cerebellum_and_its_connections L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1744-165X(14)00099-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -