Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hyperbilirubinemia, hemolysis, and increased bilirubin neurotoxicity.
Semin Perinatol. 2014 Nov; 38(7):429-37.SP

Abstract

Increased hemolysis in the presence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia appears to augment the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. The mechanism of this intensifying effect is uncertain. In direct antiglobulin titer (DAT) positive, isoimmune hemolytic disease, the bilirubin threshold at which neurotoxicity occurs appears to be lower than in DAT-negative hyperbilirubinemia. In other hemolytic conditions, the hemolysis may simply facilitate the development of extremely high serum bilirubin levels. Whether the hemolytic process per se exerts an independent effect or whether a very rapid rise in serum bilirubin might lead to greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier is unclear. In this review, we survey the synergistic role of hemolysis associated with severe hyperbilirubinemia in the potentiation of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity and suggest methods of identifying at-risk babies with increased hemolysis to allow for their increased surveillance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neonatology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, PO Box 3235, Jerusalem 91031, Israel; Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: mkaplan@mail.huji.ac.il.Department of Neonatology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, PO Box 3235, Jerusalem 91031, Israel; Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.Department of Neonatology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, PO Box 3235, Jerusalem 91031, Israel; Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25284470

Citation

Kaplan, Michael, et al. "Hyperbilirubinemia, Hemolysis, and Increased Bilirubin Neurotoxicity." Seminars in Perinatology, vol. 38, no. 7, 2014, pp. 429-37.
Kaplan M, Bromiker R, Hammerman C. Hyperbilirubinemia, hemolysis, and increased bilirubin neurotoxicity. Semin Perinatol. 2014;38(7):429-37.
Kaplan, M., Bromiker, R., & Hammerman, C. (2014). Hyperbilirubinemia, hemolysis, and increased bilirubin neurotoxicity. Seminars in Perinatology, 38(7), 429-37. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.semperi.2014.08.006
Kaplan M, Bromiker R, Hammerman C. Hyperbilirubinemia, Hemolysis, and Increased Bilirubin Neurotoxicity. Semin Perinatol. 2014;38(7):429-37. PubMed PMID: 25284470.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperbilirubinemia, hemolysis, and increased bilirubin neurotoxicity. AU - Kaplan,Michael, AU - Bromiker,Ruben, AU - Hammerman,Cathy, Y1 - 2014/10/03/ PY - 2014/10/7/entrez PY - 2014/10/7/pubmed PY - 2015/7/21/medline KW - Bilirubin KW - Bilirubin neurotoxicity KW - DAT-positive hemolytic disease KW - End tidal carbon monoxide KW - Hemolysis KW - Kernicterus SP - 429 EP - 37 JF - Seminars in perinatology JO - Semin. Perinatol. VL - 38 IS - 7 N2 - Increased hemolysis in the presence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia appears to augment the risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity. The mechanism of this intensifying effect is uncertain. In direct antiglobulin titer (DAT) positive, isoimmune hemolytic disease, the bilirubin threshold at which neurotoxicity occurs appears to be lower than in DAT-negative hyperbilirubinemia. In other hemolytic conditions, the hemolysis may simply facilitate the development of extremely high serum bilirubin levels. Whether the hemolytic process per se exerts an independent effect or whether a very rapid rise in serum bilirubin might lead to greater penetration of the blood-brain barrier is unclear. In this review, we survey the synergistic role of hemolysis associated with severe hyperbilirubinemia in the potentiation of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity and suggest methods of identifying at-risk babies with increased hemolysis to allow for their increased surveillance. SN - 1558-075X UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25284470/Hyperbilirubinemia_hemolysis_and_increased_bilirubin_neurotoxicity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0146-0005(14)00088-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -