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Randomized trial of the effect of contact lens wear on self-perception in children.
Optom Vis Sci 2009; 86(3):222-32OV

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether contact lens wear affects children's self-perceptions.

METHODS

The Adolescent and Child Health Initiative to Encourage Vision Empowerment Study was a randomized, single-masked trial conducted at five clinical centers in the United States. Subjects were 8- to 11-year-old myopic children randomly assigned to wear spectacles (n = 237) or soft contact lenses (n = 247) for 3 years. The primary endpoint was the Self-Perception Profile for Children Global Self-Worth scale. Secondary outcomes included the Physical Appearance, Athletic Competence, Scholastic Competence, Behavioral Conduct, and Social Acceptance Self-Perception Profile for Children scales.

RESULTS

Global self-worth was not affected by contact lens wear [analysis of variance (ANOVA), difference = 0.06; 95% CI, -0.004 to 0.117]. Physical appearance (ANOVA, difference = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.22), athletic competence (ANOVA, difference = 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.15), and social acceptance (ANOVA, difference = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.17) were all greater for contact lens wearers.

CONCLUSIONS

Although contact lens wear does not affect global self-perceptions of 8- to 11-year-old myopic children their physical appearance, athletic competence, and social acceptance self-perceptions are likely to improve with contact lens wear. Eye care practitioners should consider the social and visual benefits of contact lens wear when choosing the most appropriate vision correction modality for children as young as 8 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Ohio State University College of Optometry, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1240, USA. walline.1@osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19214129

Citation

Walline, Jeffrey J., et al. "Randomized Trial of the Effect of Contact Lens Wear On Self-perception in Children." Optometry and Vision Science : Official Publication of the American Academy of Optometry, vol. 86, no. 3, 2009, pp. 222-32.
Walline JJ, Jones LA, Sinnott L, et al. Randomized trial of the effect of contact lens wear on self-perception in children. Optom Vis Sci. 2009;86(3):222-32.
Walline, J. J., Jones, L. A., Sinnott, L., Chitkara, M., Coffey, B., Jackson, J. M., ... Prinstein, M. J. (2009). Randomized trial of the effect of contact lens wear on self-perception in children. Optometry and Vision Science : Official Publication of the American Academy of Optometry, 86(3), pp. 222-32. doi:10.1097/OPX.0b013e3181971985.
Walline JJ, et al. Randomized Trial of the Effect of Contact Lens Wear On Self-perception in Children. Optom Vis Sci. 2009;86(3):222-32. PubMed PMID: 19214129.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized trial of the effect of contact lens wear on self-perception in children. AU - Walline,Jeffrey J, AU - Jones,Lisa A, AU - Sinnott,Loraine, AU - Chitkara,Monica, AU - Coffey,Bradley, AU - Jackson,John Mark, AU - Manny,Ruth E, AU - Rah,Marjorie J, AU - Prinstein,Mitchell J, AU - ,, PY - 2009/2/14/entrez PY - 2009/2/14/pubmed PY - 2009/5/29/medline SP - 222 EP - 32 JF - Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry JO - Optom Vis Sci VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine whether contact lens wear affects children's self-perceptions. METHODS: The Adolescent and Child Health Initiative to Encourage Vision Empowerment Study was a randomized, single-masked trial conducted at five clinical centers in the United States. Subjects were 8- to 11-year-old myopic children randomly assigned to wear spectacles (n = 237) or soft contact lenses (n = 247) for 3 years. The primary endpoint was the Self-Perception Profile for Children Global Self-Worth scale. Secondary outcomes included the Physical Appearance, Athletic Competence, Scholastic Competence, Behavioral Conduct, and Social Acceptance Self-Perception Profile for Children scales. RESULTS: Global self-worth was not affected by contact lens wear [analysis of variance (ANOVA), difference = 0.06; 95% CI, -0.004 to 0.117]. Physical appearance (ANOVA, difference = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.22), athletic competence (ANOVA, difference = 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.15), and social acceptance (ANOVA, difference = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.17) were all greater for contact lens wearers. CONCLUSIONS: Although contact lens wear does not affect global self-perceptions of 8- to 11-year-old myopic children their physical appearance, athletic competence, and social acceptance self-perceptions are likely to improve with contact lens wear. Eye care practitioners should consider the social and visual benefits of contact lens wear when choosing the most appropriate vision correction modality for children as young as 8 years of age. SN - 1538-9235 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19214129/Randomized_trial_of_the_effect_of_contact_lens_wear_on_self_perception_in_children_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=19214129 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -