Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sex differences in response to maximal eccentric exercise.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Feb; 40(2):242-51.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

This study examined sex differences in strength loss, muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin (Mb) after high-intensity eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors in a large group of men and women.

METHODS

One hundred participants (58 women, 42 men) performed 50 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexor muscles of their nondominant arm. Maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 0.5 (12-14 h), 3, 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise. Blood samples for serum CK activity and Mb were taken at baseline and at 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise. Soreness was evaluated at baseline and at 0.5, 3, 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise.

RESULTS

Women experienced significantly greater relative strength loss immediately after exercise (-57.8% +/- 19.1) than men (-50.4% +/- 16.9%) (independent t-test; P < or = 0.05), and a greater percentage of women experienced more than 70% strength loss immediately after exercise compared with men (34.4% of women; 7.1% of men). Men exhibited a larger CK response compared with women (ANCOVA; P < or = 0.05), partly because there were more men who were high responders. There were no significant differences between the sexes for serum Mb or soreness measures. Generally, stronger relationships among CK, soreness, and strength-loss measures were found in men compared with women (r = 0.55-0.59 for men; r = 0.12-0.49 for women).

CONCLUSION

In response to eccentric exercise, women experienced greater immediate strength loss than men and were more likely to be high responders for immediate strength loss; men experienced greater serum CK activity than women and were more likely to be high responders for increased serum CK. Although the explanation for high responders to eccentric exercise remains unknown, we have shown that there are sex-specific differences in CK and strength-loss response after eccentric exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology, Totman Building, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. ksewright@kin.umass.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18202579

Citation

Sewright, Kimberly A., et al. "Sex Differences in Response to Maximal Eccentric Exercise." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 40, no. 2, 2008, pp. 242-51.
Sewright KA, Hubal MJ, Kearns A, et al. Sex differences in response to maximal eccentric exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40(2):242-51.
Sewright, K. A., Hubal, M. J., Kearns, A., Holbrook, M. T., & Clarkson, P. M. (2008). Sex differences in response to maximal eccentric exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40(2), 242-51. https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e31815aedda
Sewright KA, et al. Sex Differences in Response to Maximal Eccentric Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40(2):242-51. PubMed PMID: 18202579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in response to maximal eccentric exercise. AU - Sewright,Kimberly A, AU - Hubal,Monica J, AU - Kearns,Amy, AU - Holbrook,Mariko T, AU - Clarkson,Priscilla M, PY - 2008/1/19/pubmed PY - 2008/4/16/medline PY - 2008/1/19/entrez SP - 242 EP - 51 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: This study examined sex differences in strength loss, muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin (Mb) after high-intensity eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors in a large group of men and women. METHODS: One hundred participants (58 women, 42 men) performed 50 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexor muscles of their nondominant arm. Maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 0.5 (12-14 h), 3, 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise. Blood samples for serum CK activity and Mb were taken at baseline and at 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise. Soreness was evaluated at baseline and at 0.5, 3, 4, 7, and 10 d after exercise. RESULTS: Women experienced significantly greater relative strength loss immediately after exercise (-57.8% +/- 19.1) than men (-50.4% +/- 16.9%) (independent t-test; P < or = 0.05), and a greater percentage of women experienced more than 70% strength loss immediately after exercise compared with men (34.4% of women; 7.1% of men). Men exhibited a larger CK response compared with women (ANCOVA; P < or = 0.05), partly because there were more men who were high responders. There were no significant differences between the sexes for serum Mb or soreness measures. Generally, stronger relationships among CK, soreness, and strength-loss measures were found in men compared with women (r = 0.55-0.59 for men; r = 0.12-0.49 for women). CONCLUSION: In response to eccentric exercise, women experienced greater immediate strength loss than men and were more likely to be high responders for immediate strength loss; men experienced greater serum CK activity than women and were more likely to be high responders for increased serum CK. Although the explanation for high responders to eccentric exercise remains unknown, we have shown that there are sex-specific differences in CK and strength-loss response after eccentric exercise. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18202579/Sex_differences_in_response_to_maximal_eccentric_exercise_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -