Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hydrocarbon toxicity: an analysis of AAPCC TESS data.
Przegl Lek. 2007; 64(4-5):194-6.PL

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Human hydrocarbon exposures have the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. To determine which hydrocarbons were associated with the most severe adverse outcomes, human exposure data reported to American poison information centers were analyzed.

METHODS

Outcome data for single-substance, hydrocarbon exposures reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System from 1994 through 2003 were analyzed. Only cases with definitive medical outcomes were included. Analyses were stratified by five age groups: <6 years, 6-12 years, 13-19 years, 20-59 years, >59 years. Hazard factors were determined by calculating the sum of the major effects and fatalities for each hydrocarbon category and dividing this by the total number of exposures for that category. To normalize the data, the overall rate of major effects and deaths for each age group was assigned hazard factor value of 1. Hydrocarbon categories with a HF of > or = 1.5 were included in the final analyses. Estimated rates of major effect and fatal outcomes (outcomes/1000 people) were also calculated.

RESULTS

318,939 exposures were analyzed. Exposures to benzene, toluene/xylene, halogenated hydrocarbons, kerosene and lamp oil resulted in the highest hazard factor values.

CONCLUSIONS

These data demonstrate that hydrocarbons that are absorbed systemically and those with low viscosities are associated with higher hazard factors. The risks associated with hydrocarbons often implicated in abuse by older children and adolescents are also confirmed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

American Society of Health-System, Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation, Bethesda, MD, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17724864

Citation

Cobaugh, Daniel J., et al. "Hydrocarbon Toxicity: an Analysis of AAPCC TESS Data." Przeglad Lekarski, vol. 64, no. 4-5, 2007, pp. 194-6.
Cobaugh DJ, Seger DL, Krenzelok EP. Hydrocarbon toxicity: an analysis of AAPCC TESS data. Przegl Lek. 2007;64(4-5):194-6.
Cobaugh, D. J., Seger, D. L., & Krenzelok, E. P. (2007). Hydrocarbon toxicity: an analysis of AAPCC TESS data. Przeglad Lekarski, 64(4-5), 194-6.
Cobaugh DJ, Seger DL, Krenzelok EP. Hydrocarbon Toxicity: an Analysis of AAPCC TESS Data. Przegl Lek. 2007;64(4-5):194-6. PubMed PMID: 17724864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hydrocarbon toxicity: an analysis of AAPCC TESS data. AU - Cobaugh,Daniel J, AU - Seger,Donna L, AU - Krenzelok,Edward P, PY - 2007/8/30/pubmed PY - 2008/1/23/medline PY - 2007/8/30/entrez SP - 194 EP - 6 JF - Przeglad lekarski JO - Przegl Lek VL - 64 IS - 4-5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Human hydrocarbon exposures have the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. To determine which hydrocarbons were associated with the most severe adverse outcomes, human exposure data reported to American poison information centers were analyzed. METHODS: Outcome data for single-substance, hydrocarbon exposures reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System from 1994 through 2003 were analyzed. Only cases with definitive medical outcomes were included. Analyses were stratified by five age groups: <6 years, 6-12 years, 13-19 years, 20-59 years, >59 years. Hazard factors were determined by calculating the sum of the major effects and fatalities for each hydrocarbon category and dividing this by the total number of exposures for that category. To normalize the data, the overall rate of major effects and deaths for each age group was assigned hazard factor value of 1. Hydrocarbon categories with a HF of > or = 1.5 were included in the final analyses. Estimated rates of major effect and fatal outcomes (outcomes/1000 people) were also calculated. RESULTS: 318,939 exposures were analyzed. Exposures to benzene, toluene/xylene, halogenated hydrocarbons, kerosene and lamp oil resulted in the highest hazard factor values. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that hydrocarbons that are absorbed systemically and those with low viscosities are associated with higher hazard factors. The risks associated with hydrocarbons often implicated in abuse by older children and adolescents are also confirmed. SN - 0033-2240 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17724864/Hydrocarbon_toxicity:_an_analysis_of_AAPCC_TESS_data_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -