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Not your everyday anisocoria: angel's trumpet ocular toxicity.
J Emerg Med. 2007 Jul; 33(1):21-4.JE

Abstract

A 12-year-old boy was brought to the emergency department by his parents with new-onset anisocoria. He complained of blurry vision and of his left pupil being larger than the right. His visual acuity was normal and examination revealed a painless left mydriasis. A thorough history and targeted examination yielded the diagnosis of pharmacologic mydriasis caused by ocular exposure to Angel's Trumpet (Datura suaveolens), a plant containing toxic alkaloids with anti-cholinergic properties. The patient and his family were spared expensive and time-consuming tests (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging) or further referral. His symptoms resolved spontaneously in 3 days.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17630070

Citation

Firestone, Daniel, and Christian Sloane. "Not Your Everyday Anisocoria: Angel's Trumpet Ocular Toxicity." The Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 33, no. 1, 2007, pp. 21-4.
Firestone D, Sloane C. Not your everyday anisocoria: angel's trumpet ocular toxicity. J Emerg Med. 2007;33(1):21-4.
Firestone, D., & Sloane, C. (2007). Not your everyday anisocoria: angel's trumpet ocular toxicity. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 33(1), 21-4.
Firestone D, Sloane C. Not Your Everyday Anisocoria: Angel's Trumpet Ocular Toxicity. J Emerg Med. 2007;33(1):21-4. PubMed PMID: 17630070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Not your everyday anisocoria: angel's trumpet ocular toxicity. AU - Firestone,Daniel, AU - Sloane,Christian, Y1 - 2007/05/30/ PY - 2006/05/25/received PY - 2006/10/28/revised PY - 2007/02/28/accepted PY - 2007/7/17/pubmed PY - 2007/9/14/medline PY - 2007/7/17/entrez SP - 21 EP - 4 JF - The Journal of emergency medicine JO - J Emerg Med VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - A 12-year-old boy was brought to the emergency department by his parents with new-onset anisocoria. He complained of blurry vision and of his left pupil being larger than the right. His visual acuity was normal and examination revealed a painless left mydriasis. A thorough history and targeted examination yielded the diagnosis of pharmacologic mydriasis caused by ocular exposure to Angel's Trumpet (Datura suaveolens), a plant containing toxic alkaloids with anti-cholinergic properties. The patient and his family were spared expensive and time-consuming tests (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging) or further referral. His symptoms resolved spontaneously in 3 days. SN - 0736-4679 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17630070/Not_your_everyday_anisocoria:_angel's_trumpet_ocular_toxicity_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -