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Further glycogen decrease during early recovery after eccentric exercise despite a high carbohydrate intake.
Eur J Nutr. 2004 Jun; 43(3):148-59.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a well-known phenomenon of athletes. It has been reported from muscle biopsies that the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis is reduced after eccentric compared to concentric exercise.

AIM OF THE STUDY

Try to compensate by a carbohydrate (CHO)-rich diet the decelerated glycogen resynthesis after eccentric exercise, measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

METHODS

Glycogen, phosphocreatine, ATP, and Pi were measured in the human calf muscle. Twenty athletes divided into two groups (DOMS and CONTROL), reduced glycogen in M. gastrocnemius during two different running protocols. Additionally, 12 DOMS subjects performed an eccentric exercise while the CONTROL group rested. Subsequently, subjects consumed a CHO-rich diet (> 10 g/kg body mass/24 h).

RESULTS

In both groups, glycogen has been reduced by about 50%. The first 2 h after exercise, glycogen dropped further (-15.6 +/- 15.7 mmol/ kg ww) in the DOMS but rose by +18.4 +/- 20.8 mmol/kg ww in the CONTROL group (P < 0.001). CONTROL subjects reached resting glycogen within 24 h (137 +/- 47 mmol/kg ww), while DOMS subjects needed more than one day (91 +/- 23 mmol/kg ww; P < 0.001). Pi and Pi/PCr, indicators of muscle injury, rose significantly in the DOMS but not in the CONTROL group.

CONCLUSION

The diet rich in CHO's was not able to refill glycogen stores after eccentric exercise. Glycogen decreased even further during the beginning of recovery. This loss, which to our knowledge has not been measured before is probably the consequence of muscle cell damage and their reparation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise Physiology, Institute for Human Movement Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. zehnderm@access.unizh.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15168037

Citation

Zehnder, Monica, et al. "Further Glycogen Decrease During Early Recovery After Eccentric Exercise Despite a High Carbohydrate Intake." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 43, no. 3, 2004, pp. 148-59.
Zehnder M, Muelli M, Buchli R, et al. Further glycogen decrease during early recovery after eccentric exercise despite a high carbohydrate intake. Eur J Nutr. 2004;43(3):148-59.
Zehnder, M., Muelli, M., Buchli, R., Kuehne, G., & Boutellier, U. (2004). Further glycogen decrease during early recovery after eccentric exercise despite a high carbohydrate intake. European Journal of Nutrition, 43(3), 148-59.
Zehnder M, et al. Further Glycogen Decrease During Early Recovery After Eccentric Exercise Despite a High Carbohydrate Intake. Eur J Nutr. 2004;43(3):148-59. PubMed PMID: 15168037.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Further glycogen decrease during early recovery after eccentric exercise despite a high carbohydrate intake. AU - Zehnder,Monica, AU - Muelli,Mirjam, AU - Buchli,Reto, AU - Kuehne,Guido, AU - Boutellier,Urs, Y1 - 2004/01/06/ PY - 2003/04/04/received PY - 2003/09/22/accepted PY - 2004/5/29/pubmed PY - 2004/10/13/medline PY - 2004/5/29/entrez SP - 148 EP - 59 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 43 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a well-known phenomenon of athletes. It has been reported from muscle biopsies that the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis is reduced after eccentric compared to concentric exercise. AIM OF THE STUDY: Try to compensate by a carbohydrate (CHO)-rich diet the decelerated glycogen resynthesis after eccentric exercise, measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. METHODS: Glycogen, phosphocreatine, ATP, and Pi were measured in the human calf muscle. Twenty athletes divided into two groups (DOMS and CONTROL), reduced glycogen in M. gastrocnemius during two different running protocols. Additionally, 12 DOMS subjects performed an eccentric exercise while the CONTROL group rested. Subsequently, subjects consumed a CHO-rich diet (> 10 g/kg body mass/24 h). RESULTS: In both groups, glycogen has been reduced by about 50%. The first 2 h after exercise, glycogen dropped further (-15.6 +/- 15.7 mmol/ kg ww) in the DOMS but rose by +18.4 +/- 20.8 mmol/kg ww in the CONTROL group (P < 0.001). CONTROL subjects reached resting glycogen within 24 h (137 +/- 47 mmol/kg ww), while DOMS subjects needed more than one day (91 +/- 23 mmol/kg ww; P < 0.001). Pi and Pi/PCr, indicators of muscle injury, rose significantly in the DOMS but not in the CONTROL group. CONCLUSION: The diet rich in CHO's was not able to refill glycogen stores after eccentric exercise. Glycogen decreased even further during the beginning of recovery. This loss, which to our knowledge has not been measured before is probably the consequence of muscle cell damage and their reparation. SN - 1436-6207 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15168037/Further_glycogen_decrease_during_early_recovery_after_eccentric_exercise_despite_a_high_carbohydrate_intake_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -