Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle by short-term exercise and diet manipulation.
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jul; 287(1):E25-31.AJ

Abstract

Changes in dietary macronutrient intake alter muscle and blood substrate availability and are important for regulating gene expression. However, few studies have examined the effects of diet manipulation on gene expression in human skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to quantify the extent to which altering substrate availability impacts on subsequent mRNA abundance of a subset of carbohydrate (CHO)- and fat-related genes. Seven subjects consumed either a low- (LOW; 0.7 g/kg body mass CHO) or high- (HIGH; 10 g/kg body mass CHO) CHO diet for 48 h after performing an exhaustive exercise bout to deplete muscle glycogen stores. After intervention, resting muscle and blood samples were taken. Muscle was analyzed for the gene abundances of GLUT4, glycogenin, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK-4), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD), and uncoupling binding protein-3 (UCP3), and blood samples for glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Glycogen-depleting exercise and HIGH-CHO resulted in a 300% increase in muscle glycogen content (P < 0.001) relative to the LOW-CHO condition. FFA concentrations were twofold higher after LOW- vs. HIGH-CHO (P < 0.05). The exercise-diet manipulation exerted a significant effect on transcription of all carbohydrate-related genes, with an increase in GLUT4 and glycogenin mRNA abundance and a reduction in PDK-4 transcription after HIGH-CHO (all P < 0.05). FAT/CD36 (P < 0.05) and UCP3 (P < 0.01) gene transcriptions were increased following LOW-CHO. We conclude that 1) there was a rapid capacity for a short-term exercise and diet intervention to exert coordinated changes in the mRNA transcription of metabolic related genes, and 2) genes involved in glucose regulation are increased following a high-carbohydrate diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14761878

Citation

Arkinstall, Melissa J., et al. "Regulation of Metabolic Genes in Human Skeletal Muscle By Short-term Exercise and Diet Manipulation." American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 287, no. 1, 2004, pp. E25-31.
Arkinstall MJ, Tunstall RJ, Cameron-Smith D, et al. Regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle by short-term exercise and diet manipulation. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2004;287(1):E25-31.
Arkinstall, M. J., Tunstall, R. J., Cameron-Smith, D., & Hawley, J. A. (2004). Regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle by short-term exercise and diet manipulation. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 287(1), E25-31.
Arkinstall MJ, et al. Regulation of Metabolic Genes in Human Skeletal Muscle By Short-term Exercise and Diet Manipulation. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2004;287(1):E25-31. PubMed PMID: 14761878.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle by short-term exercise and diet manipulation. AU - Arkinstall,Melissa J, AU - Tunstall,Rebecca J, AU - Cameron-Smith,David, AU - Hawley,John A, Y1 - 2004/02/03/ PY - 2004/2/6/pubmed PY - 2004/7/23/medline PY - 2004/2/6/entrez SP - E25 EP - 31 JF - American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism JO - Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab VL - 287 IS - 1 N2 - Changes in dietary macronutrient intake alter muscle and blood substrate availability and are important for regulating gene expression. However, few studies have examined the effects of diet manipulation on gene expression in human skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to quantify the extent to which altering substrate availability impacts on subsequent mRNA abundance of a subset of carbohydrate (CHO)- and fat-related genes. Seven subjects consumed either a low- (LOW; 0.7 g/kg body mass CHO) or high- (HIGH; 10 g/kg body mass CHO) CHO diet for 48 h after performing an exhaustive exercise bout to deplete muscle glycogen stores. After intervention, resting muscle and blood samples were taken. Muscle was analyzed for the gene abundances of GLUT4, glycogenin, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK-4), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD), and uncoupling binding protein-3 (UCP3), and blood samples for glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Glycogen-depleting exercise and HIGH-CHO resulted in a 300% increase in muscle glycogen content (P < 0.001) relative to the LOW-CHO condition. FFA concentrations were twofold higher after LOW- vs. HIGH-CHO (P < 0.05). The exercise-diet manipulation exerted a significant effect on transcription of all carbohydrate-related genes, with an increase in GLUT4 and glycogenin mRNA abundance and a reduction in PDK-4 transcription after HIGH-CHO (all P < 0.05). FAT/CD36 (P < 0.05) and UCP3 (P < 0.01) gene transcriptions were increased following LOW-CHO. We conclude that 1) there was a rapid capacity for a short-term exercise and diet intervention to exert coordinated changes in the mRNA transcription of metabolic related genes, and 2) genes involved in glucose regulation are increased following a high-carbohydrate diet. SN - 0193-1849 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14761878/Regulation_of_metabolic_genes_in_human_skeletal_muscle_by_short_term_exercise_and_diet_manipulation_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -