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Vitamin E supplementation does not increase the vitamin C radical concentration at rest and after exhaustive exercise in healthy male subjects.
Eur J Nutr. 2003 Aug; 42(4):195-200.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Extensive exercise may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species and subsequently contribute to tissue damage. A compound which can protect cells and tissues is vitamin E. The vitamin E radical, formed during the radical scavenging process, can be reduced by vitamin C resulting in a higher level of the vitamin C radical (semidehydroascorbate free radical). An increase of the vitamin C radical, however, is assumed to exert prooxidative effects.

AIM OF THE STUDY

To elucidate whether supplementation of vitamin E and exhaustive exercise lead to an increase of the vitamin C radical in human plasma.

METHODS

A placebo controlled, cross over study with 13 male volunteers was carried out. After an 8 day supplementation period with 500 I.U. D-alpha-tocopherol, the subjects performed two exhaustive treadmill runs. Blood samples were collected at rest, 0, 0.25, 1, 3, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Serum was separated and concentrations of D-alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid were determined by HPLC. Vitamin C radical levels in plasma were assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

RESULTS

Vitamin E and C both showed a tendency to decrease between 3 h and 24 h after exercise. Vitamin C radical level remained stable during the whole period. Neither vitamin E supplementation nor exercise had any influence on the plasma concentration of the vitamin C radical.

CONCLUSIONS

Vitamin E supplementation under conditions of mild oxidative stress does not result in an increased vitamin C radical concentration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Chemistry, University of Kaiserslautern, Postfach 3049, 67653, Kaiserslautern, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12923650

Citation

Schneider, Matthias, et al. "Vitamin E Supplementation Does Not Increase the Vitamin C Radical Concentration at Rest and After Exhaustive Exercise in Healthy Male Subjects." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 42, no. 4, 2003, pp. 195-200.
Schneider M, Niess AM, Rozario F, et al. Vitamin E supplementation does not increase the vitamin C radical concentration at rest and after exhaustive exercise in healthy male subjects. Eur J Nutr. 2003;42(4):195-200.
Schneider, M., Niess, A. M., Rozario, F., Angres, C., Tschositsch, K., Golly, I., Battenfeld, N., Schäffer, M., Northoff, H., Dickhuth, H. H., Fehrenbach, E., Trommer, W. E., & Biesalski, H. K. (2003). Vitamin E supplementation does not increase the vitamin C radical concentration at rest and after exhaustive exercise in healthy male subjects. European Journal of Nutrition, 42(4), 195-200.
Schneider M, et al. Vitamin E Supplementation Does Not Increase the Vitamin C Radical Concentration at Rest and After Exhaustive Exercise in Healthy Male Subjects. Eur J Nutr. 2003;42(4):195-200. PubMed PMID: 12923650.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E supplementation does not increase the vitamin C radical concentration at rest and after exhaustive exercise in healthy male subjects. AU - Schneider,Matthias, AU - Niess,Andreas M, AU - Rozario,Fabian, AU - Angres,Cornelia, AU - Tschositsch,Karja, AU - Golly,Ines, AU - Battenfeld,Nicole, AU - Schäffer,Michael, AU - Northoff,Hinnak, AU - Dickhuth,Hands-H, AU - Fehrenbach,Elvira, AU - Trommer,Wolfgang E, AU - Biesalski,Hans K, PY - 2002/08/19/received PY - 2003/02/10/accepted PY - 2003/8/19/pubmed PY - 2004/4/14/medline PY - 2003/8/19/entrez SP - 195 EP - 200 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Extensive exercise may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species and subsequently contribute to tissue damage. A compound which can protect cells and tissues is vitamin E. The vitamin E radical, formed during the radical scavenging process, can be reduced by vitamin C resulting in a higher level of the vitamin C radical (semidehydroascorbate free radical). An increase of the vitamin C radical, however, is assumed to exert prooxidative effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: To elucidate whether supplementation of vitamin E and exhaustive exercise lead to an increase of the vitamin C radical in human plasma. METHODS: A placebo controlled, cross over study with 13 male volunteers was carried out. After an 8 day supplementation period with 500 I.U. D-alpha-tocopherol, the subjects performed two exhaustive treadmill runs. Blood samples were collected at rest, 0, 0.25, 1, 3, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Serum was separated and concentrations of D-alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid were determined by HPLC. Vitamin C radical levels in plasma were assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). RESULTS: Vitamin E and C both showed a tendency to decrease between 3 h and 24 h after exercise. Vitamin C radical level remained stable during the whole period. Neither vitamin E supplementation nor exercise had any influence on the plasma concentration of the vitamin C radical. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin E supplementation under conditions of mild oxidative stress does not result in an increased vitamin C radical concentration. SN - 1436-6207 UR - https://wwww.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12923650/Vitamin_E_supplementation_does_not_increase_the_vitamin_C_radical_concentration_at_rest_and_after_exhaustive_exercise_in_healthy_male_subjects_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -